Residential Development


Building Permits

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Building permits are required by law before any works to be undertaken to your property or surrounds. A building permit is required to carry out most works including new buildings, alterations, additions, verandahs, outbuildings including garages, carports, sheds, swimming pools and fences.

Building Permits
When you need a building permit
 A building permit is required to carry out most works including new buildings, alterations, additions, verandahs, outbuildings including garages, carports, sheds, swimming pools and fences. If you plan to do any building work, you should check with us to find out whether you need a building permit.

Why you need a building permit?
A building permit ensures that your building project:-

  • is built by registered and insured builders
  • has the correct documentation
  • is inspected at different stages of work
  • is independently assessed as finished and/or suitable for occupation.

Large fines apply if you build without the correct permits and you may be forced to demolish illegal building

Asset Protection (Protection of Council Assets)
Prior to the commencement of any building works (that requires a building permit), an Asset Protection permit must be obtained from Council.

Why Asset Protection is required
Asset Protection assists us to ensure that public assets (such as; road, lanes, rights of ways, footpaths, kerb and channel, drainage pits, nature strips etc) and infrastructure are not damaged as a result of any building work being carried out in the municipality.  The permit also ensures accountability is taken for the repair or reinstatement of any damage that may occur to our assets during the carrying out of building work in a timely manner.

Asset Protection Permit
To ensure Council assets are not damaged during the carrying out of building work, we require that an Asset Protection Permit be obtained and all fees are paid prior to the commencement of building works.

Owner and/or developer’s responsibilities
Any person associated with the undertaking of building including works is required to seek the appropriate permits from the proper authority.  The General Local Law does not relieve the owner and/or developer of their respective legal responsibilities in the event of public liability action arising as a result of damage to, or obstruction of such assets.

Additional guides
Council utilises the Keeping our Stormwater Clean - Builders Guide from the EPA & Melbourne Water. This document outlines the responsibilities of builders & owners, noting that heavy penalties apply for breaches that occur.  All people entering the work site e.g. contractors, site foreman, builders, must be should make themselves aware of these requirements. You can obtain a copy by contacting us or by downloading a copy from the EPA.

How to apply
When you lodge your building permit application with your building surveyor, the building surveyor will notify Council of your application and we will forward you your Asset Protection permit pack.

Asset Protection permit pack

The permit pack contains the permit (including any conditions), an invoice for the permit fee and the security bond, an application form that must be completed (and returned to us) including details of person/s paying fees and a request for final inspection.

If you have your building permit and are ready to commence building works but have not received your permit pack, you need to notify us so that a permit pack can be forwarded to you.

Notifying Council of any damage
Once Council is notified of proposed building work, we will undertake an inspection of the assets adjoining the property and document (photographs) any pre-existing damage that may exist. This information will be used to compared to the condition of our assets at the completion of the work.

Any damage to Council’s assets during the carrying out of building work must be immediately reported to us as this may pose a safety issue to the public.

Bond Refund
Once all building works are complete, the Request for Final Inspection form is to be submitted by you together with a copy of the Occupancy Permit/Certificate of Final Inspection from the building surveyor.

When Council receives the forms, an inspection of our assets will be undertaken. Any damage identified during this inspection will be referred to the permit holder and will be required to undertake repair of the identified damage within 30 days of receipt of notification.

Should the repair work not be undertaken within this time, we will undertake the work from the bond and any remaining money will be refunded. Any additional money required to cover the cost of the repair work in addition to the amount retained in the bond will be invoiced to the permit holder.

Swimming Pools and Spas
Safety barriers are required for pools and spas capable of exceeding 300mm depth of water. Any fence or safety barrier must comply with Australian Standard AS1926.1 to prevent access by young unaccompanied children.

Hard covers for spas, including lockable types, do not comply with Australian Standard AS1926.1 and still require safety barriers to be provided.

Building Permits are required:

  • For the installation of above ground swimming pools, in ground swimming pools or spas capable of exceeding 300mm in depth of water.
  • For the construction or alteration of any fencing that forms part of a safety barrier for a swimming pool or spa.

Further Information

Building Services Ph: 8470 8899

Stormwater Drains
Drains and pipes that collect water on private property belong to the property owner. Owners are responsible for their drains up to the point of connection to the Council drain or kerb and channel, known as the legal point of discharge.

The legal point of discharge is a point specified by Council where stormwater from a property must be discharged. The point is usually Council’s stormwater drain where available, or street kerb and channel, or may require design and construction of outfall drainage to Council’s closest drain via easement, nature strip, footpath or road. For Stormwater drainage requirements refer to our Design Guidelines.

We provide direction on the legal point of discharge for both existing properties and the redevelopment of residential, commercial and industrial developments.

How to Apply:

  1. The easiest way to apply is online, select Stormwater - Legal Point of Discharge Application.
  2. Alternatively, you can complete the Stormwater - Legal Point of Discharge Application Form by post or in-person. Attach any relevant information with fee.

Apply Online

You will receive a report in the mail within 10 business days.

Further Information
Capital Works
Ph: 8470 8675

Building Over Easement
An easement is a section of land registered on a property title which gives others the right to use the land for a specific purpose, such as service authorities for the installation and maintenance of utility services.

In so far as Council’s rights are concerned, if the specified use of an easement is for drainage purposes the appropriate Building Over Easement consent is required prior to Building Certification for any permanent buildings or structures over an easement (Building Regulations 2006 - Reg 310).

If there is an existing Council stormwater drain within the easement on a property or there is a possibility this easement may be required for drainage purposes in the future, permission to build over this easement will not be granted.

Please contact us prior to applying for Build Over Easement approval to confirm the status of the easement.

How to Apply?
1. Apply online or complete the Building Over Easement Application Form and return by post or in-person, along with the fee payment.
2. Submit a copy of the Certificate of Title Plan for the land.
3. Submit copy of plans showing details of the proposed structure or works to be built over or within the easement.

Apply Online

Within 2 weeks we will reply to your application in one of the following ways:

1.    Refuse the application
2.    Require further information
3.    Approve the application subject to the property owner/s signing an agreement. Upon the signing of this agreement the application will be approved.

Further Information
Capital Works
Ph: 8470 8675

Video: When do you need a building permit and how to apply.

Building Application Forms

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A building permit is required to carry out most works including new buildings, alterations, additions, verandahs, outbuildings including garages, carports, sheds, swimming pools and fences. If you plan to do any building work, you should check with us to find out whether you need a building permit.

Building Permit Application
City of Darebin offers their building services for applications for building permits within Darebin municipality.
Building Permit Application
Checklist for building application

Amendment or Extension of Time to Building Permit
If your building permit was issued by the City of Darebin Building Services, you can apply for an amendment/variation or Extension of Time to complete the works.
Application for Amendment or Extension of Time for Building Permit

Application for Report and Consent
Application for consent from council to build outside the regulations
Adjoining Owners Comment Form (Siting)
Application for Siting Concession (Dispensation)
Application for Dispensation of Corner Fences
Application for Consent to Erect Precautions over the Street Alignment
Application for Consent to Erect a Projection over the Street Alignment
Application to Build on Land Liable to Flooding

Consent for Demolition (29a)
You may need to apply for consent to demolish as part of the demolition process. Some demolition work also needs a planning permit from Council as well as a building permit. Complete this application form and forward with a copy of your site plan attached.
Application for Consent to Demolish  form (29)A

Application for Copy of Building Permit Plans and Documents
Application must be completed and signed by owner of property 
Application for Copy of Building Permit Plans and Documents

Property Information Forms
Property enquiry for building permits
Request for Property Information (Building works) Regulation 326(2)
Property enquiry when selling/purchasing property
Request for Property Information (Conveyancing) Regulation 326(1) )

Temporary Structure Application
This is for temporary structures such as marquees, tents, pre-fabricated buildings. 

Building Regulations

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The Building Regulations, Building Code of Australia and Australian Standards outline the safe construction of buildings and requirements for balconies, balustrades, handrails and fences. Smoke alarms are now compulsory in all residential buildings.

Balconies, Balustrades and Handrails In the last few years balcony collapses in several states and territories have resulted in a number of injuries and deaths. Therefore, all home owners and commercial property owners with balconies should ensure that it is inspected regularly and any required maintenance undertaken.

What can affect balconies
There are many items you as a building owner should be aware of that can affect the structural adequacy of a balcony over time. These may include:

  • Termites - Timbers can be affected by insect attack. In areas of termite risk, the appropriate timber and treatment are needed, regardless of whether the council has declared the area likely to be subject to termite attack.
  • Wet rot - Timber is affected by water. Wet rot occurs when a timber member is in constant contact with the ground or another timber member in the presence of moisture.
  • Seaside and corrosive effects - Corrosive environments can affect unprotected steel structures, reinforcing steel and fixings such as bolts and fixing plates particularly in areas near coastlines.
  • Loadings - Large pots, water features and the like, provide additional loads for a balcony to support, for which the balcony may not have been designed.

Owners actions:
As a safety measure, all home owners and commercial property owners with balconies should ensure that:

  • It is constructed following the issue of a building permit
  • It is inspected on a regular basis for any warning signs of potential collapse
  • A maintenance program is introduced to extend its design life, and
  • Where there is a doubt or a problem, an inspection by a Structural Engineer or other suitably qualified building practitioner, and remedial measures, as necessary, are arranged.

Balcony Inspections:
There are a number of building practitioners who have the skills to inspect balconies and provide advice on their safety and maintenance. These include:

  • Building Surveyors
  • Building Inspectors
  • Structural Engineers
  • Architects
  • Builders.

When balustrades or handrails are required
Balustrade or handrails must be provided along the side of any stairway or ramp, any floor, corridor, hallway, balcony, verandah, or the like, and along the side of any path to a building if it is not bounded by a wall and the surface level beneath is more than one metre away.

This requirement applies to a bedroom window opening if the window opening is 2 metres or more above the surface level below.

Construction of balustrades or handrails
Balustrade or other barrier must be installed in accordance with the following:

The height must not be less than-

a) 1 m above the floor of any access path, balcony, landing or the like; or
b) 865 mm above the nosing of the stair treads or the floor of a ramp

A transition zone may be incorporated where the balustrade or other barrier height changes from 865 mm on the stair flight or ramp to 1 m at the landing.

Openings in balustrades
Openings in balustrades (including decorative balustrades) or other barriers must be constructed so that any opening does not permit a 125 mm sphere to pass through it and for stairs, the space is tested above the nosing line.

Finished floor level
Where the finished floor level is more than 4 m above the surface beneath, any horizontal elements within the balustrade or other barrier between 150 mm and 760 mm above the floor must not facilitate climbing.

Wire Balustrades
For this purpose, a wire balustrade consist of a series of tensioned wire rope connected to either vertical or horizontal supports. A wire balustrade excludes wire mesh fences and the like.

Where wire balustrade is proposed to be used, it must be constructed in accordance with Clause 3.9.2.3 of Volume 2 of the Building Code of Australia.

The handrails and balustrading information sheet contains post spacing, wire spacing and wire types, tension and deflection requirements for vertical and horizontal wire balustrades systems. The figures contained in the information sheet are an extract from the Building Code of Australia and were derived from testing the spacing combinations in order to prevent the passage of a 125 mm diameter solid cone penetrating between the wires at a predetermined force.

Care needs to be taken to ensure that wire tension will be maintained during the life of the balustrade. In some situations, it may be necessary to incorporate "lock-off" devices to prevent loosening of the wire. Likewise, if a threaded anchor bears against a soft wood post or rail, the anchor may indent the post or rail, thus loosening the wire.

Temperature effects on the tension of the wire may be significant but there is little that can be done to allow for temperature variation in service. The shorter the wire span, the lesser the effect will be.

Fencing

Dangerous Front Fences
This may include a front fence or side fence facing a street, road or public space that is structurally unsound.

Any dilapidated or unsound common/dividing fence between properties that bounds and forms part of a swimming pool/spa is also considered an immediate danger that must be reported.

Council's Building Department will investigate common/dividing boundary fences relating to the following issues only:

  • A fence considered by the Municipal Building Surveyor to be a danger to the public or occupants (this generally does not relate trellises or screening added to a fence or to a standard lightweight construction timber or metal (Colorbond) fence unless it forms part of a swimming pool/spa enclosure)
  • Dangerous, dilapidated or illegal common/dividing boundary fences forming part of a swimming pool/spa enclosure
  • Brick fences or illegal fences on the street boundary built without a Building Permit.

Front Fence (not a Corner Fence)
If you wish to build a front fence on your property you must first decide what materials you will use as this affects the regulation height of your fence.

You will require a Building Permit to build the following types of fence

  • Colorbond and timber front fence higher than 1.5 m
  • Brick front fence higher than 1.2 m

For further information check the Fact Sheet for Corner and Front Fences. 

To apply for a Building Permit, you will need to provide us with the following:

  • Maximum boundary wall length and height if the fence is greater than 1.5 m high
  • Application for a Building Permit form
  • Architectural plans - view the Example Plan of a Front Fence
  • Copy of Certificate of Title

If you have an easement at the front of your property, you will need to complete the Application to Build Over Easement.

Corner Fence
Corner properties have extra requirements for front and side fences.

Fences can only be up to:

  • 1 m high within 9 m of the point of intersection
  • 1.5 m on the front boundary
  • 2 m on the side boundary
  • of 2m (with a building permit) on declared roads.

Boundary Fences
The standard height for boundary fences between adjoining properties can be up to 2 metres in height. Fences outside of these heights will require a Report & Consent from Council, as well as a Building Permit. 

Declared Roads
A declared road is defined as: a freeway or an arterial road within the meaning of the Road Management Act 2004. Check the list of Declared Roads in Darebin.

Dividing or Common Boundary Fences
Side fences can be up to 1.5 m high within the first 3 meters of your front property boundary, and increase to 2 m from that first point onwards without a Building Permit. 

You will require a building permit for any fences higher than these limits, and whenever it is proposed to vary from the building regulations through the Report and Consent Approval process.

If the dividing/common boundary fence also acts as part of enclosure of a spa or swimming pool, a Building Permit is required regardless of height. View the 'Swimming Pools and Spas page'.

Common/Dividing boundary fences are generally governed under the Fencing Act and are a civil issue. Council's Building Department has no jurisdiction on matters relating to a common fence where a Building Permit is not required.

Further Information
Disputes Settlement Centre of Victoria
Ph: 1300 372 888

Law Institute of Victoria
Ph: (03) 9607 9311
Fencing Online

Neighbouring Property Owner Details
Our Customer Service staff can assist in providing the name and mailing address of neighbouring property owners in regard to Notice to Fence. To obtain these details, please contact our Customer Service Officers on (03) 8470 8888. 

The information we provide can only be used for fencing matters stated on the application form. No other personal information will be provided about the neighbour.

Fencing Disputes
These issues are a civil matter dealt with the owners under the Fencing Act, which is not a Council matter. The following services may be able to assist:

Smoke Alarms
Smoke alarms are compulsory in all residential buildings including houses, units, flats, boarding houses, hostels and accommodation for the aged. All smoke alarms must be connected to the mains power with a battery back-up (unless the building was constructed prior to 1 August 1997, where battery operated smoke alarms are acceptable).

It is important that your smoke alarms are checked and maintained on a regular basis. All smoke alarms must comply with Australian Standard AS3786.

Smoke alarms must be installed on or near the ceiling of every storey of a building. Smoke alarms are intended to detect smoke before it reaches people sleeping in a building. Therefore they must be located in a position designed to wake sleeping occupants up and in time to evacuate a building.

The regulation requires a smoke alarm be located between each area containing bedrooms and the remainder of the building such as hallways or within 1.5m of the entrance to each bedroom.

An alarm is required on every storey, located in the path of travel people will most likely take to evacuate the building. This will ensure an alarm is activated before smoke makes the common exit path impassable. Alarms must be centrally located and audible to all areas not immediately connected to the main story.

Lodge your application

You can lodge a Consent application and pay the application fee in the following ways:

  • Online - Applications can be lodged through eServices.
  • In person - Applications can be lodged at our Building Services Unit counter located on Level 1, 274 Gower Street, Preston between the hours of 8:45am and 4:45pm, Monday to Friday (except public holidays).
  • My mail - Applications, along with the relevant application fee can be lodged by mail to:

Building Services Unit
Darebin City Council
PO Box 91
PRESTON 3072

Further Information
Building Services
Ph: (03) 8470 8899


Single Houses

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You may need a Planning Permit to extend or make alterations to your property or fence; Your property may be affected by a heritage overlay or a flooding zone which requires further consideration.

Lots under 300 square metres
A Planning Permit may be required to construct or extend a building or fence, or make alterations to a house on a property with a lot of less than 300 square metres.

To establish if you require a planning permit you obtain a recent copy of your Certificate of Title from the Land Titles Office and contact our Planning Department on 8470 8850 between the hours of 8:45am – 4:45pm, Monday to Friday (excluding public holidays).

Environmentally Sustainable Design
Prior to lodging your application you should ensure you have provided all of the information required by the Residential Development checklist.

Heritage Overlay
A Planning Permit may be required to demolish, construct or extend a building or fence, or make alterations to a building on land affected by a Heritage Overlay. Prior to lodging your application you are encouraged to discuss your proposal with Council’s Heritage Advisor to ensure your development respects the heritage significance of the area or building. 

More information about heritage in Darebin, including heritage studies and site information, permit exemptions and guidelines for development. 

Pre Application Meeting
Prior to lodging your application you are encouraged to discuss your proposal with our Heritage Advisor to ensure your development respects the heritage significance of the area or building. This will help to ensure a good design outcome and may shorten the time it will take for us to make a decision on your application.

To arrange a pre-application meeting with our Heritage Advisor please contact the Planning Department on 8470 8850 between the hours of 8:45am – 4:45pm, Monday to Friday (excluding public holidays).

Flooding
A Planning Permit may be required to construct or extend a building or fence, or make alterations to a building on land that may be affected by flooding. These areas are generally affected by a Special Building Overlay or Land Subject to Inundation Overlay.

A permit is not required under the Special Building Overlay or Land Subject to Inundation Overlay for any buildings, works, fences or road-works where Melbourne Water has agreed in writing that the flow path is not obstructed. You should contact Melbourne Water prior to lodging your application.

Prior to lodging your application
Prior to lodging an application you should ensure you have provided all of the information required by the flood prone areas checklist.

Development Contributions
If you are constructing a new house you may be required to pay a development contribution before a Building Permit is issued.

You should contact us to establish if you are required to pay a development contribution.

Further Information:
Planning Department
Ph: 8470 8850
Monday-Friday 8:45am–4:45pm

Unit Developments

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Unit Developments are the construction of multiple houses on one property, this includes semi-detached unit developments, apartment buildings and mixed use developments that include residential components.

Darebin Planning Scheme
In general the Darebin Planning Scheme encourages the construction of additional houses within existing residential areas, usually resulting in more than one house on a property. However, careful consideration needs to be made in terms of neighbourhood character, impacts to the surrounding properties and the amenity for the future occupants of the new houses. 

How Many Units can I Put on my Land?
There is no fixed answer to this question as it depends on a number of factors including but not limited to:

  • Scale of the development
  • How close the land is to local services
  • Size of the land
  • Context of neighbouring properties (i.e. the location of significant trees, open space; and compliance or otherwise with relevant planning controls)

All these factors combined would determine whether a site is suitable for multiple units.

It is recommended that any plans for more than one unit on a property be discussed with a private planning consultant or building designer / architect, neighbours and our Planning Department prior to lodging an application. In all cases, a planning permit is required to build multiple units on land.

Single Dwelling Covenants
Your property may be affected by a restriction that is commonly referred to as a ‘single dwelling covenant’. A single dwelling covenant usually does not allow more than one house to be constructed on a property.

We cannot issue a Planning Permit for more than one house on a property if it is affected by a single dwelling covenant. There are additional types of covenants that may also affect your proposal.

You will need to obtain a recent copy of the Certificate of Title from the Land Titles Office to determine if your property is affected by a covenant.

A Planning Permit is required to change or delete a covenant.

The Restrictive Covenants information sheet provides information about restrictive covenants and how to vary or remove covenants from a Certificate of Title. This checklist details the information that is required for applications for a planning permit to vary or remove a restrictive covenant.

Heritage Overlay
Your property may be affected by a Heritage Overlay, which can affect your ability to demolish buildings and the design and scale of any new construction. Prior to lodging your application you should discuss your proposal with Council’s Heritage Advisor to ensure your proposal respects the heritage significance of the area or building. 

Pre Application Meeting
Pre-application meetings are for people who intend to lodge a planning permit application.  You can meet with our planning staff prior to lodgement for advice and assistance in the preliminary stages of the planning and design process.

Benefits of pre- application meetings
Pre-application meetings are helpful in identifying key issues that may be important to the future use of the property. The intention of the meeting is to conduct an open and productive forum whereby all parties work towards a high quality outcome.  Pre-application meetings should also give some level of certainty about the outcome of the application to ensure a smoother and more efficient process of the application.

Advice given in a pre- application meeting
Pre-application meetings are not able to investigate every detail covered through the formal assessment process once the application is lodged. Given the time available and the level of detail it is impossible to give a thorough assessment at this stage. We give advice in good faith and we are not bound in any future decisions.

Types of applications appropriate for a pre-application meeting
Any type of unit development is appropriate for pre-application meetings. However, we strongly encourage pre-application meetings for:

  • 5 or more houses
  • Apartments buildings
  • Mixed use buildings

Topics discussed in a pre-application meeting
At the meeting you can discuss:

  • Initial concepts
  • Detailed design aspects
  • Any other requirements 

Our planning officers will give their professional opinion on the proposal and provide guidance where possible. However, it must be remembered that the meeting is not intended to pre-empt the outcome of the application. Once the planning application is lodged it will need to undergo a thorough assessment against the provisions of the Darebin Planning Scheme. 

Preparing for a pre-application meeting
Preparation is essential! The quality of advice given depends on the level of detail and accuracy of the information presented to the planner. It is essential the you research the proposal and identify relevant issues to raise at the meeting.

You should provide as much detail as possible about the proposal. The following checklist may be of assistance.

  • A full copy of title that is no more than three months old.
  • Photographs of the site and the surrounding area in particular the neighbouring adjacent properties and the streetscape and any significantly sized vegetation.

A neighbourhood and site description plan showing:

  • Existing buildings on site
  • Location of buildings on at least four adjoining properties (including habitable room windows and private open space areas).
  • A concept plan at 1:100 showing detail such as the proposed building footprint at all storeys, window placement and the internal layout of all buildings.

Concept plan including the following:

  • Earthworks – any cut and fill and possible locations for retaining walls.
  • Location of existing vegetation.
  • Location of car parking facilities and vehicle access arrangements.
  • Location of crossovers existing and proposed crossovers.
  • Concept design of elevations at 1:100.

It is highly recommended that you attend a pre-application meeting with all of the above information required to give a reasonable understanding of the proposal by the planner. This will assist the planner to give more accurate and useful advice for your project. The above documentation may require the services of a consultant to assist in their preparation and to facilitate the application process. 

It is intended that the planner that you have the pre-application meeting with will manage the application once it is lodged; however, this is not always guaranteed due to staff movement or workloads.

Location of pre-application meetings
Pre-application meetings are held at the Darebin City Council at 274 Gower Street, Preston. A meeting will need to be booked ahead of time to ensure the availability of a planner and meeting room. This can be made by contacting the Planning Department on 8470 8850 between the hours of 8:45am – 4:45pm, Monday to Friday (excluding public holidays).

Development Contributions
If you are constructing or extending a commercial or industrial building you may be required to pay a development contribution to the City of Darebin before a Building Permit is issued. The Development Contribution will be invoiced after a Planning Permit has been issued for the development.

Subdivision

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Considering a subdivision of your property? We recommend you apply for a Development Permit first to keep the process simple, as vacant land subdivisions are more complex and time consuming.

Subdivision is the process of splitting land or a building into a number of lots which can then be sold separately as individual titles. Subdivision can also include re-aligning or altering title boundaries even if the number of lots does not change. 

We strongly encourage you to apply for a permit to develop your land before making an application to subdivide. Once the Development Permit is obtained, the subdivision should be a straightforward process which creates lot boundaries to accord with the approved development.

We discourage ‘vacant lot’ or ‘backyard’ subdivision where the subdivision is not linked to a development proposal. ‘Vacant’ land subdivisions must be assessed against Clause 56 of the Darebin Planning Scheme. These applications are often more complex and time consuming than those where a development permit has been obtained.

How to subdivide your property

Step 1 - Apply for a planning permit to subdivide
The permit provides ‘in principle’ support for the subdivision under the Planning and Environment Act 1987 and the Darebin Planning Scheme. The permit contains conditions (set by Council and the servicing authorities) which must be met before we approve the final subdivision.

Step 2 - Apply for and obtain a certified Plan of Subdivision
The certified plan is the result of a comprehensive survey and must be prepared by a licensed land surveyor. The plan is signed by Council when the relevant permit conditions have been satisfied. The servicing authorities must also agree to certification under the Subdivision Act 1988

Step 3 - Obtain a Statement of Compliance (SOC)
Council signs the SOC once all the requirements made by Council and the servicing authorities have been satisfied. By signing the SOC, Council indicates that the subdivision is ready for lodgement at Land Victoria.

Step 4 - Lodge your plans with the Land Registry
Lodge the certified plan, the Statement of Compliance, street numbering advice and any additional documents prepared by your land surveyor with the Land Registry. Lodgement is usually undertaken by your solicitor or conveyancer. This process will allow the new titles for each Lot to be registered.

Other Applications
Other applications handled by our Subdivision Planner include:

  • Commercial and industrial subdivision
  • The creation, variation or removal of easements
  • The creation, variation or removal of a Restrictive Covenant
  • Consolidation of land

 Lodging your application

  1. Online - Applications for subdivision are usually lodged online by the relevant land surveyor through SPEAR (Surveying and Planning through Electronic Applications and Referrals). This is our preferred method of lodgement of subdivision applications.
  2. In person - Applications can be lodged at Planning Department counter located on Level 1, 274 Gower Street, Preston between the hours of 8:45am and 4:45pm, Monday to Friday (except public holidays).
  3. By mail - Applications, along with the relevant application fee can be lodged by mail to:

Statutory Planning Unit
Darebin City Council
PO Box 91
PRESTON VIC 3072

Obtaining Titles and Registering Subdivisions
Once we have approved a subdivision, it must be registered with the Titles Office (Land Registry) or the new titles for your Lots will not be issued.

Owners Corporations
For comprehensive information related to Owners Corporations, Body Corporates and buying and selling property contact:
Consumer Affairs Victoria 
Ph: 1300 55 81 81

Removal of Trees
A planning permit may be required to prune or remove vegetation if it is on land affected by a Vegetation Protection Overlay, Environmental Significance Overlay, or Heritage Overlay or if the vegetation is native to Victoria.

To establish if you require a planning permit you should contact us.

Further Information
Planning Department
Ph: 8470 8850
Monday-Friday 8:45am–4:45pm

Covenants

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Your property may be affected by a restriction that prevents you using and developing your property in a certain way. Council cannot issue a Planning Permit if the proposed use or development would allow the covenant to be breached.

You will need to obtain a recent copy of the Certificate of Title from the Land Titles Office to determine if your property is affected by a covenant.

A Planning Permit is required to change or delete a covenant.

Prior to lodging an application you should ensure you have provided all of the information required by the Covenant Checklist.

Lodging Your Application

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Prior to lodging an application you should ensure you have provided all of the information required by the relevant checklist.

Prior to lodging your application you should ensure you have provided all of the information required by the Residential Development Checklist.

  • Online - Applications can be lodged through Council’s eServices portal.
  • In person - Applications can be lodged at Planning Department counter located on Level 1, 274 Gower Street, Preston between the hours of 8:45am and 4:45pm, Monday to Friday (except public holidays).
  • By mail - Applications, along with the relevant application fee can be lodged by mail.

Mail to:
Statutory Planning Unit
Darebin City Council
PO Box 91
PRESTON VIC 3072

Development Contributions
If you are constructing a new house you may be required to pay a development contribution to the City of Darebin before a Building Permit is issued. Contact us to establish if you are required to pay a development contribution.

Further Information
Customer Service
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